safeTALK in schools – Pilot Study

The initial findings of the safeTALK in Schools pilot research study indicate that educating high school students about suicide and ways to seek help is not only appropriate, but vital to creating more resilient and suicide-safe communities.

Lifeline Research Foundation Executive Director Alan Woodward said the findings, presented by researchers from Orygen Youth Health Research Centre and Lifeline Central Australia at the Suicide Prevention Australia Conference in July, could have significant implications on how we talk about suicide in Australia and beyond.

“There is a worldwide gap in research on the effectiveness of educational programs like safeTALK in Schools,” Mr Woodward said. “As such, the innovative work of Lifeline Central Australia has been pivotal in helping us forge valuable new ground in this area.

“So far, the pilot study with an Alice Springs high school has shown that the delivery of safeTALK in Schools is both safe and effective, helping students identify people at risk of suicide and linking them to relevant services.”

Mr Woodward said the pilot study also revealed limitations around current suicide prevention strategies.

“Young people surveyed in the research have reported the greatest barrier to seeking help was the stigma around suicide and ‘what would people think’, rather than the accessibility of services,” Mr Woodward said.

“This challenges many current approaches to suicide prevention for young people that focus on making services available and promoting their use.”

The safeTALK in Schools research project is being run in partnership with Lifeline Central Australia, Orygen, the University of Melbourne and Columbia University, with support from the Lifeline Research Foundation.

Project Team - safeTALK in Schools

Image right to left: Jo Robinson, Orygen; Karen Revel, Lifeline Central Australia; Eleanor Bailey, Orygen; Alan Woodward, Lifeline Research Foundation

- See more at: https://www.lifeline.org.au/About-Lifeline/Publications-Library/Lifeline-Newsletters/August-2015/safeTALK-in-schools-Pilot-Study#sthash.Tnj3nCss.dpuf

safeTALK in schools – Pilot Study

The initial findings of the safeTALK in Schools pilot research study indicate that educating high school students about suicide and ways to seek help is not only appropriate, but vital to creating more resilient and suicide-safe communities.

Lifeline Research Foundation Executive Director Alan Woodward said the findings, presented by researchers from Orygen Youth Health Research Centre and Lifeline Central Australia at the Suicide Prevention Australia Conference in July, could have significant implications on how we talk about suicide in Australia and beyond.

“There is a worldwide gap in research on the effectiveness of educational programs like safeTALK in Schools,” Mr Woodward said. “As such, the innovative work of Lifeline Central Australia has been pivotal in helping us forge valuable new ground in this area.

“So far, the pilot study with an Alice Springs high school has shown that the delivery of safeTALK in Schools is both safe and effective, helping students identify people at risk of suicide and linking them to relevant services.”

Mr Woodward said the pilot study also revealed limitations around current suicide prevention strategies.

“Young people surveyed in the research have reported the greatest barrier to seeking help was the stigma around suicide and ‘what would people think’, rather than the accessibility of services,” Mr Woodward said.

“This challenges many current approaches to suicide prevention for young people that focus on making services available and promoting their use.”

The safeTALK in Schools research project is being run in partnership with Lifeline Central Australia, Orygen, the University of Melbourne and Columbia University, with support from the Lifeline Research Foundation.

Project Team - safeTALK in Schools

Image right to left: Jo Robinson, Orygen; Karen Revel, Lifeline Central Australia; Eleanor Bailey, Orygen; Alan Woodward, Lifeline Research Foundation

- See more at: https://www.lifeline.org.au/About-Lifeline/Publications-Library/Lifeline-Newsletters/August-2015/safeTALK-in-schools-Pilot-Study#sthash.Tnj3nCss.dpuf



Poster of ASIST trained people across Aotearoa, New Zealand since January 2014-December 2015.

Thanks to the Ministry of Health for their ongoing support in funding a number of FREE or subsidised seats for Maori / Pasifika whānau, hapu, iwi, aiga, fanau and Maori / Pasifika NGO.

Training Opportunities & Workshops We can arrange safeTALK or ASIST workshops to suit your organisation.

For a list of confirmed workshops, dates and locations in the coming months see the registrations page.



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